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Working in Saudi Arabia

While finding a job in Saudi Arabia is getting to be more difficult than it once was, they are still available and gaining employment in the country is not impossible. This is partly due to the fact that not too many people are lining up to work in Saudi Arabia. It is possible to land teaching jobs in one of the numerous schools, in addition to management, and consulting positions in the oil and gas sector. Construction is another area of growth in the kingdom creating jobs, as the government is making large investments in the infrastructure in an effort to attract foreign investment.

For the educated expatriate, wages in Saudi Arabia are very appealing, especially when the zero tax is factored in. The cost of living is low compared to most western countries, and normally accommodation as well as a yearly trip home is a part of the salary package. Salaries for unskilled workers like maids, labourers or drivers, especially for those from a third world country are relatively low.

Most of the work contracts in the Kingdom are for men. It is almost impossible for women to land a job, even in teaching, unless she comes as a half of a married teaching couple. While some large corporations do hire women occasionally, the hiring regulations are a bit hazy.

To be able to work in Saudi Arabia you will need a Work Visa or at times even a Business Visa does the trick. A work visa is simple enough to get for those with a contract to work in the country. While the company hiring will take care of the paper work, you will have to supply medical and educational certificates that have been legalized. This is valid for 90 days, after which the hiring company will convert it to Iqama, a residency and work permit allowing for a longer stay. The Business visa is usually used by employees of foreign companies in Saudi Arabia; it is a multiple entry visa valid for three months or six months used to bring in employees for short durations. At times it is also used by companies to bring in employees during their trial periods, and if they don’t work out, it is easy enough to get them out of the country.  

 

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The International Wanderer aims to provide you with up to date and accurate information. However, content is submitted by writers/wanderers from all over the globe. Sometimes we will get it wrong. Furthermore, working holiday and other visa opportunities and requirements (or numbers allocated) may change. New working holiday agreements are constantly being negotiated between countries. We suggest that you contact the nearest consulate or embassy of the country you wish to visit to ensure you have the most recent and accurate information. For further information about this website see our Terms & Conditions.