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Working in Jamaica

People can easily employ their skills in a number of trades in Jamaica as the country offers a varied market for job opportunities in private business and state-run establishments. The major employment sectors include agriculture, mining, tourism, manufacturing, insurance and finance.

Tourism is the most important branch of the services sector adding over sixty percent to the GDP and providing job opportunities to the workforce. The pleasant weather throughout the year ensures a steady stream of visitors leading to a flourishing tourism industry. The resort regions along the western and northern coasts offer livelihood in hotels, restaurants and taverns depending on tourism.

The Jamaican bauxite industry is mostly owned by international corporations which have turned the tiny island into a global aluminium business player. Work in the country’s mining industry has created thriving employment opportunities. The music industry too is flourishing. It is home to numerous recording studios, and artists exporting music around the world, and opening doors to related work opportunities. The stunning natural scenery has also opened doors for large film productions opening doors to whole new job ventures on long or short term basis.

Obviously the government ensures that qualified Jamaicans are given the first preference when it comes to hiring, but it also recognizes that the expertise does not frequently exist, and there is always a short supply of human resource possessing certain specialized skills. Foreign workers are required to get work permits which are approved at the Minister of Labour’s discretion. Non-Commonwealth citizens like the United States must get work permits before applying for work visas. Such permits require proof that the vacancy was advertised and no local was qualified. 

 

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The International Wanderer aims to provide you with up to date and accurate information. However, content is submitted by writers/wanderers from all over the globe. Sometimes we will get it wrong. Furthermore, working holiday and other visa opportunities and requirements (or numbers allocated) may change. New working holiday agreements are constantly being negotiated between countries. We suggest that you contact the nearest consulate or embassy of the country you wish to visit to ensure you have the most recent and accurate information. For further information about this website see our Terms & Conditions.