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Working in Ghana

Landing employment in Ghana can be rather difficult for a couple of reasons. First of the unemployment rate is high and secondly there are no comprehensive listings of resources. Majority of the expatriates are hired before they land in the country. The domestic economy hinges around agriculture, which contributes to roughly one third of the GDP, and is the major source of income for over fifty per-cent of the work force.  Needless to say not too many people are tempted to come to Ghana to work the farms.

Fortunately, there are other job opportunities in Ghana. The mining industry, as well as oil, gas, and shipping are a great lure for foreign workers. Ghana also has a very large diplomatic presence, largely due to the overall peace and stability the country enjoys. Hence, there are job options in Ghana for those having diplomatic and political work background. Usually foreign workers with expertise in project management, general management and financial control are sought. Employers hiring expatriates do with the assumption that eventually the skills of foreign workers will be transferred to locals, who will take over. So, expatriates should be prepared to share their knowledge.

Unlike many other countries in West Africa, the enduring political stability and elevated levels of safety make Ghana a desirable tourist destination. Additionally the country offers natural and cultural treasures, warm hospitality and prevalence of English language to the visitors. All this ensures fairly secure occupations in Ghana in the tourism sector.

All foreigners must have work permits to legally take up a position in Ghana. These are issued through and restricted to the company that hires the worker. Foreign companies based in Ghana are entitled to work permit quotas based on the amount of money invested. It is illegal to start work in Ghana without first being in possession of a valid work permit. Furthermore, even if a work permit has been granted, the holder is not allowed to start work until the Director of immigration has given the permit holder a residence permit. 

 

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The International Wanderer aims to provide you with up to date and accurate information. However, content is submitted by writers/wanderers from all over the globe. Sometimes we will get it wrong. Furthermore, working holiday and other visa opportunities and requirements (or numbers allocated) may change. New working holiday agreements are constantly being negotiated between countries. We suggest that you contact the nearest consulate or embassy of the country you wish to visit to ensure you have the most recent and accurate information. For further information about this website see our Terms & Conditions.