• Select your destination



    Invalid Input

     

Working in French Polynesia

Traditional work in Polynesia is divided along the lines of gender. Men deal with the fishing, construction and have the responsibility to protect the family unit, while the women gather and process horticultural products and use them in the manufacture of basketry goods and bark cloth. Both sexes share the gardening activities. Modern employment in Polynesia can be found in the major cities.

Legal jobs in Polynesia are difficult to find, and should you be lucky enough to find something, then work visas are given even more rarely. This is due to the fact that jobs are difficult to find for the local people say nothing of the foreigners. A vast majority of the occupations in Polynesia are eventually funded through French aid. This untraceable public funding allows the domestic obligations to be run and go towards public sector positions to establish the government, administrative and judicial infrastructure of the islands. Hence, these positions tend to be given to the locals almost exclusively. In the last five years only 85 work permits were issued! There are rare exceptions only in circumstances of exceptionally skilled doctors, secondary and tertiary teaching posts in Polynesia or lawyers.

What is more amazing is the fact that even private sector employment in Polynesia , for jobs in hotels or other tourism related industry, the locals are generally favoured. Additionally the slowdown in tourism in recent years has led to many hotel chains laying off their own existing local workers. If you are determined to find a trade in Polynesia, then learning to speak French and gaining knowledge of the local culture will definitely be of tremendous help.

Work permits for Polynesia are not required by French citizens, but for everyone else. Even European Union citizens have to go through the process of obtaining a work permit to work legally. Some specialized sectors like being a pearl grafter, a highly skilled tourist guide, Chinese chef or a banking executive stand a better chance of landing a job in Polynesia. 

 

 

Before you take off

Please contact us if you believe information on this page is incorrect, misleading or offensive, or if something important is missing.

The International Wanderer aims to provide you with up to date and accurate information. However, content is submitted by writers/wanderers from all over the globe. Sometimes we will get it wrong. Furthermore, working holiday and other visa opportunities and requirements (or numbers allocated) may change. New working holiday agreements are constantly being negotiated between countries. We suggest that you contact the nearest consulate or embassy of the country you wish to visit to ensure you have the most recent and accurate information. For further information about this website see our Terms & Conditions.