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Studying in Nicaragua

 

Nicaragua has a whole list of Higher Education centers, but only two are considered to be at the very top of the educational ratings. One is a state university and the other is a private one. Many of the universities are quite happy to enrol foreign students, for special courses by the semester or for the full academic year. Because of its recent history Nicaragua is the best place to study such subjects are political science, social justice or popular movements. One course open to outside students offers the chance to study the social and political effects of the Nicaraguan Revolution and the problems faced by the democratic process.

There are internships in human rights courses also. Plus such subjects as media studies, sustainability, literacy and youth culture. Another course for foreign students offers them the chance to learn, teach and build in an all-round program. At least one outside university sends its undergraduates to Nicaragua to round off its language course.  Of course, Nicaragua is also a good place to learn Spanish. There are many immersion or intensive courses to take in various locations.

In most towns there is a Casa de Cultura, House of Culture. These places offer many non-academic and more fun type things to study. You can find courses on hairdressing, painting, folklore, dance and others. All of it conducted in Spanish, but don’t worry, Nicaraguans, like most Latin Americans love to hear people trying to speak their language. They will laugh and help you. At a dollar a class, it’s a cheap and easy way to meet local people. 

There are over 50 universities and institutions offering higher education technical training in Nicaragua, accredited by the National Council of Universities in Nicaragua. However it’s the Spanish schools that attract most foreigners to Nicaragua.  There are several great Spanish schools in Granada and San Juan del Sur, many offering live-in lodging options with local residents. 

Some of the content on this page was contributed by....

Brooke Rundle, blogger at San Juan Live and co-author of the Insider Guide to San Juan del Sur electronic guidebook.

 

 

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